Partners in this Project

CTRM


Francoise Bourzate



People of San Luis Grande digging a gully for the water pipe in San Luis Grande. (2010).

Frans Cayo (center) guiding people to an old catchment tank (2009).

Alan Perry and Frans Cayo in San Luis Grande.

Francoise Bourzat of the Circle of Hearts foundation (left) visiting San Luis Grande. (2008)

People of San Luis Grande at the catchment tank.

People of San Luis Grande

Pilón Lajas
Pilón Lajas is of international importance as recognized by UNESCO as a Biosphere Reserve (BR) and Indigenous Territory (TCO) - one of three that exist in Bolivia.  It is an integral component of the National System of Protected Areas (SNAP).
This Indigenous Territory (TCO) offers the opportunity to conserve the cultural values and traditions of the indigenous communities that live in the area.  It is an important reservoir of water at local and global levels. The reserve is known for its diversity with about 2500 species of plants, 500 species of birds, 95 species of amphibians and reptiles and 100 species of fish.
PROJECTS | DRINKING WATER RIO QUIQUIBEY
Clean drinkingwater and sanitation systems urgently needed along Rio Quiquibey Bolivia

Indigenous communities of the bioreserve Pilón Lajas along Rio Quiquibey don't have access to clean drinking water and sanitation resulting in health problems. A study in the communities is needed to identify clean drinking water sources, the best technical solution, the way the people of the community are organised and its capacity and willingness to participate with labour in kind during construction, operation and maintenance. During a participative workshop in each community the set up of a water committee will be discussed and arranged.

We ask your help to finance
the study and the design. The study will cost € 4000,- (we now have € 550,-). After this study is done and a design is made it will be possible to make a solid project plan and fundraise for the construction.

Please donate.


Images of the construction of the water system in San Luis Grande, at Rio San Luis Grande connecting with Rio Quiquibey (2009/10). From the left to the right: 1. Frans Cayo leading and coordinating, 2. Triny Tayo on the left, 3. A water tank for San Luis Grande. 4. Digging a gully for the water pipe. 5. The system works.


Introduction
The majority of the indigenous communities in the Biosphere and Indigenous Territory Pilón Lajas in the Bolivian Amazon do not have access to clean drinking water and proper sanitation. Traditionally, the people in the area take their drinking water from small rivers, which in the past were crystal clean. But due to agriculture, mining and waist river-water is becoming polluted, loaded with sediments and unsafe for drinking. This is resulting in increased health problems, especially among children. Medical help is not readily available and during the dry season, when the water levels are low, canoe trips to and from the closest medical post can take more than 36 hours.

In december 2012 the governing body of Pilón Lajas, the Consejo Regional Tsimani Moseten (CTRM) and the Amazon Fund signed an intentional agreement to support eight communities along Rio Quiquibey.

During 2009-2010, Amazon Fund facilitated the construction of a drinking water system in the San Luis Grande community along the Quiquibey and this has lead the CTRM to request further assistance from Amazon Fund to construct similar drinking water systems in eight other most needed communities along the Quiquibey river.

The communities urgently need the identification of alternative sources of clean water, simple gravity based drinking water systems including sediment filters and storage tanks in the larger communities. Together, the 8 communities constitute a cluster of small populations along the Quiquibey River.


Proposed project
The proposed project concerns the construction and/or improvement of drinking water systems for about 550 residents of 8 indigenous communities along the Quiquibey river and within the Bioreserve Pilon Lajas.

Intervention Strategy
Phase 1: Preparation
Concerns a study and inventory of the situation in each of the communities and to identify the best technical solution, the way the people of the community are organised and its capacity and willingness to participate with labour in kind during construction, operation and maintenance. During a participative workshop in each community the set up of a water committee will be discussed and arranged.

Phase 2: Design and planning
This phase concerns the design of appropriate drinking water systems for each of the selected communities and the drafting of a project plan with implementation schedules and cost estimates.

Phase 3: Implementation
The construction of the systems as a participative effort of the population of each community assisted.. Includes training in monitoring and maintenance of the systems.

Phase 4: follow-up: operation & maintenance and monitoring
The proper functioning of the systems will be monitored over a period of about two years by staff of CTRM and coordinated by the Amazon Fund representative at Rurrenabaque. According to the requirements, this phase includes further training.


The communities
1.- Emborcada:
This community has about 55 residents. The community has a small drinking water system which is not well functioning and only serves a small part of the population. The population not served by this system take water directly from the river and during the dry season all residents of the community depend on water from the river. The system needs to be redesigned, reconstructed and expanded, including the construction of one or several storage tanks and sanitation.

2.- Asunción:
160 residents. The community has a small drinking water system which is not well functioning and only serves a small part of the population. The population not served by this system take water directly from the river and during the dry season all residents of the community depend on water from the river. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

3.- Gredal:
70 residents. The community lacks a drinking water system. During the dry season, from July to December, the residents take water from the river and from some very small streams and a spring during the rainy season when the river is muddy. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

4.- Bisal:
The 35 residents of the very small community take water from the Quiquibey River for drinking and cooking, also during the rainy season when the river waters are loaded with sediments. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

5.- Corte:
50 residents. The community has no drinking water system and all residents take water from the river. During the rainy season from December to July the river water is muddy and unsuitable for drinking. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

6.- San Bernardo:
As in Bisal, in this small community with 35 residents there is no drinking water system and all residents take water from the Quiquibey River for drinking and cooking. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

7.- San Luis Chico:
About 100 residents. Does not have drinking water anymore, neither any sanitation. Needed is to install water storage tanks for distribution in the community. The San Luis creek water is suitable for drinking and cooking some times of the year. A study is needed to identify clean drinking water sources and to determine an adequate drinking water and sanitation system design.

8.- Bolsón:
Bolsón is community of 75 residents located at the upper end of the Quiquibey River, 15 hours by motor canoe from Rurranabaque. The community has no drinking water system and the residents use the Quiquibey river water for drinking and cooking, also during the rainy season when the waters are muddy. Alternative water sources need to be analysed as is the need for a proper drinking water system. Bolson has no school.





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Account Foundation Amazon Fund - Roosteren, The Netherlands
Bank: Triodos
Accountnumber: 197654908
IBAN Number: NL TRIO 0197654908
BIC Code: TRIONL2U

Chamber of commerce nummer: 14103019
Tax nummer: 8195.36.775.B.01

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Trini Tayo, mayor of San Luis Grande thanks all supporters of the drinking water system. View Larger Map

See the drinking water project San Luis Grande 2010 >>
Slide show